Did you know?

Did you know?

Did you know?

  • that Applied Digital Solutions (the inventors of Digital
    Angel technology) have developed a miniaturized thermoelectric generator. "The
    wafer-thin, fingernail-size" battery" converts body heat flow into
    electrical power to run embedded or attachable medical devices as well as
    wristwatches; does away with need to periodically change batteries and has an
    addressable worldwide market in excess of $2.5 billion"
    For more
    information visit their website: www.asdx.com or www.digitalangel.net
  • that new high-tech parking meters are to be trialed in New
    Zealand. The "Dial a Park" meters have drawn interest from Auckland and
    Wellington City Councils who plan to start trials by the end of the year. The
    meters charge parking fees to your cellphone account and the eventual plan is to
    allow the meters to send a text message to your phone when it is about to
    expire. The developers didn't rule out the possibility that the meters would
    also be used to alert parking inspectors when they expire.
  • that in the wake of the terrorist attacks on the United
    States of America, British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, is considering compulsory
    identity cards as part of a review of security laws in his country.
  • that a California company is working on a method of producing
    electricity from the sole of your shoe. By fitting a shoe with electroactive
    polymers they plan to convert the mechanical energy of walking into electric
    power to charge up gadgets, batteries and other devices. The department of
    defence is funding the program with the hope that they can reduce some of the
    weight carried into battle by soldiers by eliminating cumbersome batteries.
  • that scientists are optimistic they will create the first
    cloned human before the end of the year. Reports that the work was going faster
    than initially expected have been made. "It is going well enough so we may
    attempt the first production of embryos, cloned embryos in the very near future.
    That is, three or four months from now," Dr. Panayiotis Zavos reported last
    week. Many countries are appealing to the United Nations to create an
    international ban on the cloning of humans, but they may run out of time if they
    don't act quickly.
  • that a recent report by South Africa's Medical Research
    Council says that AIDS was responsible for one third of all deaths in the
    country this year. The MRC report said that if things keep going as they are,
    HIV and AIDS would account for 66 percent of all deaths by 2010 and that the
    toll from the disease would have risen to between five and seven million. The
    report sees average life expectancy falling from 54 years in 2001 to 41 in 2010,
    when it expects about 780,000 people to die of HIV/AIDS related causes.
  • that Barry Smith teaching videos are now available in NTSC
    (American) format video as well as the PAL (Australia/NZ) format.