Come in Captain Kirk

Come in Captain Kirk

Come in Captain Kirk

Talking of conspiracy theories
and shady characters in long dark coats and
sunglasses…

 It was the year 1987 and David Kirk was
selected to replace the injured Andy Dalton as the captain of the
New Zealand All Blacks for the inaugural Rugby World Cup being
played in Auckland, New Zealand (Rugby is New Zealand’s
national game). David had a way about him, described as
‘boyish charm’. He was highly intelligent, a
qualified medical practitioner, though he had never practiced,
putting aside his career at that time to pursue his sporting
interests.

After successfully leading the All Blacks to
victory in the World Cup he stunned a rugby mad nation that same
year, when he announced his retirement from the game. Why on
earth would he retire? He was only 26. He was good at
international level for at least another Rugby World Cup, four
years away. He was living the dream of about 90% of New Zealand
males - of wearing the much vaunted and internationally revered
black jersey with the silver fern over the heart, of doing the
haka (Maori War challenge), intimidating and striking fear into
the hearts of foes before every international match. In short, he
had an appreciative nation at his feet.

And then he was gone. What did he give all
this away for?

He became a Rhodes scholar and off to England
he went to study. Cecil Rhodes, the British colonial pioneer and
statesman, who died in 1902, left the vast majority of his
personal fortune to set up the scholarship scheme. The scheme was
unprecedented in scale as well as vision was established to
“improve the lot of humanity, and work towards maintaining
peace between nations.” Only the “elite” are
awarded these scholarships and those sought out must show a
combination of intellect, character and physical vigor that gives
the most promise for future distinction. At any one given time
there can be up to 200 scholars studying at Oxford University
over their two or three year tenure. The scholarship meets the
costs of their airfares, living expenses, fee’s and pays
them a living allowance. With the majority of Rhodes scholars
going on to work in the fields of Public Service, academic life,
business, medicine and law.

One notable Rhodes scholar was President Bill
Clinton. Further research in this area has indicated that eight
graduates from his class of 1968 were directly linked to his
political administration, with another from the same year,
Boisfeuillet Jones, becoming the President and General Manager of
the Washington Post, one of America’s most influential
newspapers.

‘Chosen ones’ are trained in the
ways and ideology of One World Government. Did this happen to our
good Captain? Well, Captain Kirk disappeared for a while, beamed
up you could say, and when he beamed back a few years later he
was an advisor to Jim Bolger and New Zealand’s National
Party Government. Every now and then Captain Kirk would appear on
the National news, always standing in the background, and on the
odd occasion seen to be whispering in attentive ears.

How did a qualified medical practitioner
turned rugby icon, become qualified to act as an advisor to
Government? What was his agenda and purpose in that advisory
role? You know, I could have Kirky all wrong; perhaps he always
had a strong political bent hidden behind his study toward a
medical degree. You no longer see him on TV in this role any
more. In the early to mid nineties he was writing sports columns
for various papers. Since then we have not heard a lot or seen a
lot of David Kirk. Perhaps like “Men in Black” he
still slips around the corridors of the Beehive advising
successive Governments, ensuring they remain on track for the
plans that One World Organisations have for this country. Or
perhaps he served his purpose and was ‘replaced.’
Maybe he just grew tired of the double standards and games played
and withdrew from politics and returned to medicine. I hope so -
if you know maybe you would like to tell us.